Springsteen & I

Springsteen & I

Springsteen & I

A big screen celebration of New Jersey's most famous son - The Boss, Bruce Frederick Joseph Springsteen. The documentary, billed as "made by the people and for the people", uses fan-submitted video, stories and photographs to chart the singer-songwriter's 40-year rock career and the impact his music has had on the lives of diehards.

Director Baillie Walsh and executive-producer Ridley Scott offered an open invitation for people to submit video, photographs and personal reflections on Springsteen. Said Walsh at the time: "We are searching for a wide variety of creative interpretations, captured in the most visually exciting way you can think of... If you can't use a camera or are not sure how to capture your story then get in touch and we will link you up with someone who can." The documentary was then constructed around the submitted video plus previously unseen concert footage.

2013Rating: M, Infrequent coarse language and sexual reference124 minsUK
BiographyDocumentaryMusic
Director:
Baillie Walsh ('Flashbacks of a Fool')
Cast:
Bruce Springsteen

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Springsteen & I / Reviews

Total Film

Total Film

You pity the kids of the more Boss-obsessed but there's pomposity-pricking humour and uplift here, too.

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Time Out

Time Out

All the little blue-collar Bosses and Bossettes out there in Jungleland will lap up this lively low-budget love letter.

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The Telegraph

The Telegraph

This isn't really a film, it's memorabilia.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

There are, however, a couple of bits that seem to get to the heart of Springsteen's singular place in the pop music world.

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Little White Lies

Little White Lies

As much as this is a film about extreme fandom and joys of getting close and personal with a music legend, Walsh's film also offers a neat examination into the art of stage banter.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Springsteen and I gathers these homemade tributes into an effusive feature that will resonate with the kind of die-hard Boss fans who helped make it, but quickly grows tiresome for the less devout among us.

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