Shine A Light

Shine A Light

Shine A Light

Martin Scorsese directed concert film, covering a performance of the Rolling Stones at the Beacon Theatre in New York - filmed over two days while on a break from touring in 2006.

Filmed by a massive crew of outstanding cinematographers including Robert Richardson (The Aviator), John Toll (Braveheart), Andrew Lesnie (Lord of the Rings), Stuart Dryburgh (The Piano) and Ellen Kuras (Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind).

2007Rating: M, Infrequent coarse language122 minsUSA
DocumentaryMusic
Director:
Martin Scorsese ('No Direction Home: Bob Dylan', 'The Departed', 'The Goodfellas', 'Raging Bull', 'The King Of Comedy')
Cast:
Martin ScorseseMick JaggerKeith RichardsCharlie WattsRon WoodJack WhiteBill ClintonChristina Aguilera
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Reviews & comments

It shone on me

A worthwhile, if little unusually presented doco style on the times of the legends, the Rolling Stones. And all at over 60, not a paunch amongst them. marvellous.

4.0
0
Village Voice

Village Voice

press

Shine a Light's only point seems to be: You try this at 60. One would hope that, after "The Last Waltz" and "No Direction Home," Scorsese might venture beyond making a glossy episode of "Ripley's Believe It or Not." Nope, and we're not supposed to question it: Like the Stones, Marty's earned the right to coast, especially in his senior years.

0
Variety

Variety

press

Martin Scorsese’s energetic account of a Stones concert at Gotham’s Beacon Theater in fall 2006 takes full advantage of heavy camera coverage and top-notch sound to create an invigorating musical trip down memory lane, as well as to provoke gentle musings on the wages of aging and the passage of time.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

As the director of the documentary Shine a Light, Martin Scorsese is a besotted rock ’n’ roll fan who wholeheartedly embraces its mythology.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

Never feels like less than an event.

4.0
0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

A triumph for Scorsese and a document for the band, Shine A Light is a five-star experience for Stones fans. For those less enamoured with the ageing rockers, it goes a long way to explaining their longevity.

4.0
0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

This film is the next best thing to seeing the legendary band play live, and in some regards it's better, since you get in close and personal (and tickets only cost $15). The audience is practically on stage with the Rolling Stones close enough to see rivulets of sweat run down Mick's craggy cheek. He's still the consummate showman and a great mover for a man of 64. He's obviously very proud of his body and has numerous costume changes.

4.0
0
BBC

BBC

press

Scorsese holds back for too long on classics like Sympathy For The Devil and Brown Sugar, skipping others completely. Fans mightn't get the total satisfaction they're after, but the Stones do a lot more than try.

3.0
0
Village Voice

Village Voice

press

Shine a Light's only point seems to be: You try this at 60. One would hope that, after "The Last Waltz" and "No Direction Home," Scorsese might venture beyond making a glossy episode of "Ripley's Believe It or Not." Nope, and we're not supposed to question it: Like the Stones, Marty's earned the right to coast, especially in his senior years.

0
Variety

Variety

press

Martin Scorsese’s energetic account of a Stones concert at Gotham’s Beacon Theater in fall 2006 takes full advantage of heavy camera coverage and top-notch sound to create an invigorating musical trip down memory lane, as well as to provoke gentle musings on the wages of aging and the passage of time.

0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

As the director of the documentary Shine a Light, Martin Scorsese is a besotted rock ’n’ roll fan who wholeheartedly embraces its mythology.

0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

Never feels like less than an event.

4.0
0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

A triumph for Scorsese and a document for the band, Shine A Light is a five-star experience for Stones fans. For those less enamoured with the ageing rockers, it goes a long way to explaining their longevity.

4.0
0
Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

press

This film is the next best thing to seeing the legendary band play live, and in some regards it's better, since you get in close and personal (and tickets only cost $15). The audience is practically on stage with the Rolling Stones close enough to see rivulets of sweat run down Mick's craggy cheek. He's still the consummate showman and a great mover for a man of 64. He's obviously very proud of his body and has numerous costume changes.

4.0
0
BBC

BBC

press

Scorsese holds back for too long on classics like Sympathy For The Devil and Brown Sugar, skipping others completely. Fans mightn't get the total satisfaction they're after, but the Stones do a lot more than try.

3.0
0

It shone on me

A worthwhile, if little unusually presented doco style on the times of the legends, the Rolling Stones. And all at over 60, not a paunch amongst them. marvellous.

4.0
0