Poi E: The Story of Our Song

Poi E: The Story of Our Song

Poi E: The Story of Our Song

From director Tearepa Kahi (Mt. Zion), this documentary tells the story of iconic, chart-topping, Kiwi song Poi E by the Patea Māori Club. Conceived by Dalvanius Prime and brought to life by residents of Patea, hit hard by the economic tribulations of the Muldoon era, Poi E captured, and changed, New Zealand culture.

Says Kahi, "In those times, it was the English songs that were known, but this Māori song prevailed and made it to the top, because of the beauty and pride we have for our language... The world we live in today was in some sense paved by Dalvanius. The iwi Māori radio stations, Māori Television are all results of his hard work."

2016Rating: PG, Mild coarse language92 minsNew Zealand
DocumentaryMusic

Streaming (2 Providers)

Poi E: The Story of Our Song / Reviews

Flicks, Liam Maguren

Flicks, Liam Maguren

To call this film a crowd-pleaser is an understatement (‘pleased’ is how the Queen feels when she receives a cup of Earl Grey at the right temperature). The crowd at the Civic during opening night of the New Zealand International Film Festival was electrified by Tearepa Kahi’s cinematic celebration of our song that – wisely – becomes a celebration of our language as well.

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Stuff

Stuff

Will leave you tapping your toes, laughing at all the 80s fashions and culture, and smiling all the way home.

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New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

You'll laugh, you'll possibly cry, yes you'll get that damn tune stuck in your head for days. But you may even learn some of its lyrics other than that chorus. It'll be worth it.

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New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

They call it a feel-good movie, but it's more than that. People laughed, cried, cheered, and even sang along...

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Newshub

Newshub

Disarming and charming, hilarious and moving... And above all, 100 percent Kiwi.

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New Zealand Listener

New Zealand Listener

A wonderful celebration of creativity, resilience and, above all, identity.

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Metro Magazine

Metro Magazine

I am not usually lost for words ... “ecstatic”, “lovely”, “important”, “thank god it isn’t the 1970s any more”.

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