Inch'Allah

Inch'Allah

Inch'Allah

French-Canadian drama - a winner at Berlin Festival 2013 - set in Jerusalem where a Canadian doctor's sympathetic nature is brutally challenged by the realities of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and terrorism. Stars Evelyne Brochu (Café de Flore). More

"Chloé is a young Canadian doctor working in a West Bank refugee camp, where she monitors the pregnancies of young Palestinian patients under the supervision of Michaël, a French obstetrician. Between checkpoints and stray bullets, Chloé learns about war, and those who bear its burden: Rand, pregnant with her first child; her eldest brother Faysal, a passionate member of the resistance with whom Chloé falls in love; their younger brother Safi, who dreams of leaving Palestine; and Ava, the young Israeli soldier who lives upstairs from Chloé in Jerusalem. Torn between the two sides of the conflict, wrapped up in the absurdity of the struggle, Chloé tries as best she can to build bridges… until the conflict draws her into its cycle of violence and she internalises the conflict." (Vancouver International Film Festival)

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2012Rating: M102 minsCanada, FranceFrench, Arabic, Hebrew and English with English subtitles
DramaWar

Streaming (1 Providers)

Inch'Allah | Awards

Award Winner
FIPRESCI Prize and Prize of the Ecumenical Jury (Special Mention) winner at Berlin Film Festival 2013.

Inch'Allah | Reviews

Flicks, Adam Fresco

Flicks, Adam Fresco

Canadian writer-director Anaïs Barbeau-Lavalette’s second feature owes much to her documentary movie roots. It’s less a narrative than a docu-drama journey through the Israeli-Palestinian border. Young Canadian doctor Chloé (Evelyne Brochu) ventures daily from Jerusalem through checkpoints, soldiers and citizens to work in a West Bank refugee camp.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

A hard-edged drama with a very fuzzy center.

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The Dissolve

The Dissolve

Tries hard, and serves up a few moments of compelling specificity, but for the most part, it has little to offer beyond good intentions. For a subject this daunting and knotty, that isn't nearly enough.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Barbeau-Lavalette builds a persuasive sensory immediacy, even as her story grows increasingly contrived.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Inert drama attempts to explore the motivation behind a suicide bombing.

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