Golden Years

Golden Years

Golden Years

A posse of retirees turn to robbing banks in this British ensemble comedy featuring Bernard Hill (The Lord of the Rings) and Virgina McKenna (Born Free).

A combination of fate, a pensions crisis and a stubborn refusal to accept the injustice of old age contrives to force law abiding, retired couple Arthur (Hill) and Martha Goode (McKenna) into a life of crime.

2016Rating: PG, Mild themes, sexual references and coarse language96 minsUK
ActionComedyCrimeDrama
81%
want to see

Reviews & comments

Flicks, Matt Glasby

Flicks, Matt Glasby

flicks

The so called “grey dollar” – not to be confused with the pink one – is something of a cinematic growth market, as the proliferation of Red and Best Exotic Marigold Hotel fare attests. Similarly talent-heavy but thrill-light is John Miller’s genial UK geri-com. Written by, of all people, TV DIY doyen Nick Knowles, it gives the brilliant Bernard Hill (Lord Of The Rings) a rare lead role, alongside a cast of silver stalwarts including Phil Davis (Quadrophenia), Simon Callow (Four Weddings and a Funeral) and Una Stubbs (TV’s Sherlock).

2.0
Time Out

Time Out

press

It’s amiable enough if you’re not expecting much, but the story lacks energy and the production values are as lazy as the characterisation.

2.0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

There are the seeds of something interesting here, but premise and talent are ill-served by crude and cliched characterisation and thudding execution...

2.0
Stuff

Stuff

press

Fans of TV shows like New Tricks and movies like Waking Ned Devine and Saving Grace will lap up the oldies-behaving-badly and slapstick farce of this amiable British comedy.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

[A] flat-footed farce, which never delivers on its full comic potential.

Flicks, Matt Glasby

Flicks, Matt Glasby

flicks

The so called “grey dollar” – not to be confused with the pink one – is something of a cinematic growth market, as the proliferation of Red and Best Exotic Marigold Hotel fare attests. Similarly talent-heavy but thrill-light is John Miller’s genial UK geri-com. Written by, of all people, TV DIY doyen Nick Knowles, it gives the brilliant Bernard Hill (Lord Of The Rings) a rare lead role, alongside a cast of silver stalwarts including Phil Davis (Quadrophenia), Simon Callow (Four Weddings and a Funeral) and Una Stubbs (TV’s Sherlock).

2.0
Time Out

Time Out

press

It’s amiable enough if you’re not expecting much, but the story lacks energy and the production values are as lazy as the characterisation.

2.0
The Guardian

The Guardian

press

There are the seeds of something interesting here, but premise and talent are ill-served by crude and cliched characterisation and thudding execution...

2.0
Stuff

Stuff

press

Fans of TV shows like New Tricks and movies like Waking Ned Devine and Saving Grace will lap up the oldies-behaving-badly and slapstick farce of this amiable British comedy.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

[A] flat-footed farce, which never delivers on its full comic potential.