Crossfire Hurricane

Crossfire Hurricane

Crossfire Hurricane

Rolling Stones documentary from the director of The Kid Stays in the Picture, looking back at their career-defining moments - from their first show at London's Marquee Club to the peak of international stardom.

Examining their status as the 'anti-Beatles', the film features historical footage of interviews, news reels and concerts (much of it previously unseen) and commentary from Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Charlie Watts, Ronnie Wood and former Stones Bill Wyman and Mick Taylor.

Director Brett Morgan "invites the audience to experience firsthand the Stones' nearly mythical journey from outsiders to rock and roll royalty. This is not an academic history lesson." Produced by the Rolling Stones to coincide with the band's 50th anniversary, the title is taken from the opening lines of the song Jumping Jack Flash.

2012Rating: M111 minsUK, USA
BiographyDocumentaryMusic

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Crossfire Hurricane / Reviews

Flicks

Flicks, Rebecca Barry Hill

The Rolling Stones weren’t always in the public favour, as this raw and entertaining biopic reminds us. Before they were a global institution, they were cocky teens who played blues covers. Then they became idols whose music and swagger tapped into the youthful dissatisfaction of the 60s...

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Variety

Variety

Hardcore music buffs, however, may feel left wanting more, especially since single-album docus like Spike Lee's recent 'Bad 25' and Blighty's 'Classic Albums' series have offered much richer, musicological explorations of the art of noise.

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Time Magazine

Time Magazine

The funny thing about the Stones’ story is that it includes about twenty years of turbulence and brilliance, then another thirty of stability, belovedness and (relative) creative dormancy.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

Just like one of those Stones albums of the last three decades: it's fun, it has terrific moments, but in the end it pales in comparison with earlier triumphs.

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New York Post

New York Post

'Crossfire' is a different way of making a documentary — only voices in the present and only video in the past. But who said the Stones ever played by the rules?

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New York Daily News

New York Daily News

The Stones have been better showcased and explained than they are in 'Crossfire Hurricane'. Still, as personalities and musicians, they never fail to provide a good measure of satisfaction.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Viewers without much prior knowledge of the band may well be intrigued; fans with too much knowledge may whine a little over what was left out, but should be pleased by what has made it in, and what they haven't seen or heard.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Business as usual from the Stones, and good fun on its own terms. However, anyone expecting buried treasure or fresh insights into ancient rock folklore will get no satisfaction here.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Nothing terribly new, but great fun, all the same. Morgan has assembled a hugely enjoyable, tightly edited journey through the Stones' creative heyday.

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