Café de Flore

Café de Flore

Café de Flore

French-Canadian drama examining two disparate stories of love, transitioning from 1960s Paris to modern-day Montreal. From the director of The Young Victoria. More

"Set in present-day Montreal, the first story centres on Antoine (Kevin Parent), a successful DJ and divorced father of two girls who is wildly infatuated with his girlfriend Rose (Evelyne Brochu). However, he still has feelings for his ex, Carole (Hélène Florent). The second story takes place in Paris, 1969. Jacqueline (Vanessa Paradis) is the fiercely devoted single mother of Laurent, a young boy with Down's syndrome. Their days are rituals of school drop-offs, affectionate kisses and Laurent’s constant request to listen to the jazz album Café de flore. When a young girl, also with Down's syndrome, joins Laurent’s class, Jacqueline’s tightly woven world begins to fray." (Toronto International Film Festival 2011)

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2011Rating: MA15+121 minsCanada, FranceFrench with English subtitles
DramaRomanceWorld Cinema

Streaming (2 Providers)

Café de Flore | Awards

Award Winner
Winner of Best Actress, Make-Up and Visual Effects at the 2012 Genie Awards (Canadian Academy Awards).

Café de Flore | Reviews

64%55 reviews

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

All reviews on Rotten Tomatoes
Variety

Variety

[A] loose-limbed, emotionally complex work.

Full review
Total Film

Total Film

An overlong, emotionally shallow study of so-called 'twin flames', possible reincarnation and learning to let go of love.

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Time Magazine

Time Magazine

The film is generous to all its besotted creatures, and to the audience as well. Viewers who fall in love with Café de Flore will find that it loves them back.

Full review
The Guardian

The Guardian

Remove the subtitles, and it's one of Cameron Crowe's head-in-the-clouds dramas, as scripted by M Night Shyamalan...

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Little White Lies

Little White Lies

Disappointing, frustrating nonsense.

Full review
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Young Victoria director Vallée tackles something altogether more complex with equal flair, even if his two storylines never quite gel.

Full review