45 Years

45 Years

45 Years

Geoff and Kate Mercer (Tom Courtenay and Charlotte Rampling in award-winning performances) are a week away from their 45 year wedding anniversary. What should be a time of celebration for this childless couple enjoying rural retirement is derailed by the news that the body of Geoff's first love has been found, preserved in the glacier she fell into fifty years earlier.

While Geoff is visibly rattled, the effect on Kate is more subtle. As she explores her husband's photo archives, making fresh discoveries about him while trawling through his past, Kate finds herself overcome by jealousy and doubt.

"Outwardly, everything is business as usual. But the camera cautiously registers how a well-tuned coexistence is going out of kilter. Whether over a shared breakfast or a lonely wander through the town, Kate feels more and more like a stranger in her own life. 45 Years tells the story of two people who, caught up in unexpected emotions, are forced to bolster themselves against unfamiliar feelings and, in doing so, have the rug pulled out from under their feet. After 45 years, which feeling will prevail on the couple's big day?" (Berlin International Film Festival)

Best Actress (Charlotte Rampling) and Best Actor (Tom Courtenay) at Berlin International Film Festival 2015.
2015Rating: M94 minsUK
Drama

Streaming (4 Providers)

45 Years / Reviews

Flicks, Matt Glasby

Flicks, Matt Glasby

The mechanics of a happy marriage are subtly put to the scalpel in writer/director Andrew Haigh’s measured drama, an ever-so-British response to the likes of Amour. Based on David Constantine’s short story In Another Country, it finds Kate (Charlotte Rampling) and Geoff (Tom Courtenay) living out a contented retirement in the countryside and preparing to celebrate their 45th wedding anniversary.

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Variety

Variety

Haigh's casting choices for the two lead roles pay rich dividends.

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Time Out

Time Out

It's a film of small moments and tiny gestures that leaves a very, very big impression.

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The Telegraph

The Telegraph

Haigh’s very fine, classically modulated film keeps these questions alive until literally its last shot, and lets them jangle their way through you for days afterwards.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

Mr. Courtenay, a naturally demonstrative actor, registers a convincing blend of longing, confusion and shame. Ms. Rampling, a stiller, deeper-running pool, conveys emotions so strange and intense that they don't quite have names.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

A moving and absorbing drama featuring two performers offering a lifetime's wisdom and technique in their performances.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

A quietly explosive film, a potent drama with a nuanced feel for subtlety and emotional complications.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Do not expect blazing emotional fireworks, just finely calibrated performances and deep reserves of inner torment.

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Herald Sun

Herald Sun

A searing drama charged with raw, yet poignant fury.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Full of restraint, from both its director and leads, this is a quiet gem with the power to move.

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