13 Assassins

13 Assassins

13 Assassins

Cult Japanese director Takashi Miike (Audition) takes a break from his lunatic-laden thrillers to deliver this periodic samurai epic (in the proper sense of the word).

At the withered end of Japan's feudal era (along with samurai influence), a group of unemployed samurai are enlisted to bring down the Shogun's sadistic above-the-law younger brother, Lord Naritsugu. With the country threatening to plunge into a war-torn future, this band of assassins commence a final stand in order to prevent the masochist from ascending into power.

This is a remake of Eiichi Kudo’s 1963 black-and-white film of the same name.

2010120 minsJapan, UK
ActionMartial ArtsWorld Cinema
Director:
Takashi Miike ('Audition', 'Ichi the Killer', 'Gozu', 'Visitor Q', 'Full Metal Yakuza')
Writer:
Daisuke TenganKaneo Ikegami
Cast:
Kôji YakushoTakayuki YamadaYûsuke IseyaGorô InagakiMasachika IchimuraMikijiro Hira

Streaming (3 Providers)

13 Assassins / Reviews

Flicks

Flicks, Andreas Heinemann

It’s worth going out of your way to see the aforementioned battle scenes on a big screen, as such visual spectacle more than makes up for the film’s other weaknesses and won’t be nearly as impressive on DVD.

Full review
Variety

Variety

This at first slow-moving and then wildly kinetic actioner possesses a cool classicism.

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Total Film

Total Film

Takashi Miike's period samurai drama takes a while to get going, but the fight sequences make it worthwhile.

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Time Out

Time Out

13 Assassins will floor connoisseurs of action, mood and the dignity of a pissed-off scowl.

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

The film is terrifically entertaining, an ambitious big-budget epic, directed with great visuals and sound .

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

A beautifully lensed but rather unremarkable Japanese period piece.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

A decent historical drama, with one of the best extended battle scenes (a full half of the movie is the face-off in the ‘village of death’) in recent memory.

Full review