The Walk

The Walk

The Walk

Joseph Gordon-Levitt is Philippe Petit, the real-life Frenchman who walked across the World Trade Center’s twin towers on a tightrope in 1974. Robert Zemeckis (Back to the FutureFlight) directs this dramatised true story, also the subject of the Academy Award-winning documentary Man on Wire

2015Rating: PG, Mild themes and coarse language123 minsUSA
DramaTrue Story & BiographyBlockbuster

Streaming (3 Providers)

The Walk / Reviews

Flicks, Liam Maguren

Flicks, Liam Maguren

The 3D is the best thing about The Walk. I have never said this about any movie and I doubt I'll ever say it again (except for maybe the new Paranormal Activity). It’s the most effective use of the extra dimension I’ve seen since Gravity. But if you’re not wearing those plastic glasses, there’s no strong reason to see this.

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Variety

Variety

An entirely different brand of spectacle from what audiences have come to expect from recent studio tentpoles, sharing a true story so incredible it literally must be seen to be believed.

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Time Out

Time Out

Ultimately there's enough daredevil verve here to offset the pedestrian comedy undergirding it.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

You can't help but hold your breath and clutch the armrests when Philippe steps out into the sky.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

I actually hid my eyes at one point, overwhelmed by the sheer visceral spectacle of it all.

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Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

[Zemeckis'] hallmark as a director is his passion for visual effects and his use of CGI and 3D is dazzling.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

The film's final 20 minutes, when you see the aerialist going back and forth and back and forth with all of Lower Manhattan unfolding beneath his feet, are alternately mesmerizing, exhilarating and terrifying.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

The film's payoff more than compensates for a lumbering setup, laden with cloying voiceover narration and strained whimsy.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

It's extremely antic for the most part, covering a lack of real story with a lot of distracting quirk. Yet when Petit's foot slips out onto a wire thousands of metres from the ground, it's quietly mesmerising.

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