The Croods: A New Age

The Croods: A New Age

The Croods: A New Age

Nicolas Cage, Emma Stone, Ryan Reynolds and Catherine Keener return to lend their voices to the sequel of the 2013 CG-animated prehistoric adventure comedy. The Croods are now living - and misbehaving - in an odd new world with a new family who have seemingly created a safe haven full of food and protection. However, with a no-leaving policy, the confined space seems oddly familiar...

2020Rating: PG, Mild themes and animated violence95 minsUSA
AnimatedKids & Family

Streaming (3 Providers)

The Croods: A New Age / Reviews

Flicks

Flicks, Liam Maguren

Silly and fun but never mindless, The Croods: A New Age is a cinema-worthy family-friendly event in a year sorely lacking them. While the story of confinement feels weirdly relevant in a world where lockdowns are the norm, its kindhearted attitude towards nature feels more timely than ever in the wake of a climate emergency. So what if it doesn’t have that heartaching moment? This awful year’s had too many of those.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

In an era where there's no shortage of clever animated features that appeal to kids while still tickling the grownups, the laughs here are about as fresh as the short-lived 1960s sci-fi comedy, It's About Time.

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Variety

Variety

For those who wish they’d just slow it down and tell a decent story, The Croods: A New Age feels like an assault on the cranium, a loud and patently obnoxious 21st-century “Flintstones” with far more sophisticated technology, but nothing new to offer in the script department.

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Slash Film

Slash Film

The Croods: A New Age is going through the motions, accomplishing the basic level of work required in pulling off a computer-animated feature. It’s a strange way to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday, even in a strange year like this.

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Screen Daily

Screen Daily

The comedic sparks and emotional stirrings simply aren’t as potent this time around, despite some colourful animation and an occasionally inspired silly streak.

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RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

A decent first half and solid voice work throughout succumbs to total chaos for the second half and the realization that there’s almost no actual artistic intent here. No story, no character, no world-building, no design. It’s all bright colors and loud noises. You’d think we’d evolved beyond that by now.

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IndieWire

IndieWire

It’s a little silly, very colorful, and entertaining enough to deliver some good-hearted ideas that aren’t beholden to any period in time. Worth nearly a decade of push-pull to get here? Probably not, but on its own merits it’s a charming throwback — not necessarily a “new age,” but the remnants of a classic one.

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Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

The film is brightly colored, inventively designed, and constantly flirting with the outright psychedelic, but it's so packed full of incident that it rarely gives its jokes the space to land.

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A.V. Club

A.V. Club

With eleven different characters to serve—not counting several animal sidekicks—A New Age has a lot going on in terms of plot and action, with a litany of new alliances, betrayals, and team-ups. But the sequel is not as visually sophisticated as its predecessor.

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San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle

So there’s a lot going on here, and director Joel Crawford and his teams efficiently keep the story moving along. There’s a wonderful “Flintstones” versus “Jetsons” vibe, the characters are, as usual, appealing.

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