Suburban Mayhem

Suburban Mayhem

Suburban Mayhem

Grimy, Australian suburbia comes to life in this black comedy about 19 year old Katrina (Emily Barclay) and her slutty, low-life, murderous ways.

Katrina is stuck in suburbia with a toddler and her devoted dad. Her brother Danny is in jail for life for murder. No mum. The neighbours are scared of her. The police can't keep up with her. Nobody can control her but everybody's trying. She misses her brother. She needs money for his appeal. She's not going to work a day in her life and she knows her dad's not going to cough up with any cash. She's first in line for the family inheritance… but daddy aint’ dying soon. All she needs to do now is convince one of her lovers to do the dastardly deed, and she's never had trouble getting men to do what she wants.

Australian Film Institute Awards 2006; winner Best Actress (Emily Barclay), Best Supporting Actor (Anthony Hayes)
200790 minsAustralia
ComedyDrama

Reviews & comments

Variety

Variety

press

What starts as a predictably enjoyable ride through the hothouse world of suburbia unexpectedly loses steam half way through "Suburban Mayhem," the latest addition to the gloriously outrageous line of amoral uber-bitches that fails to inject new life into the comic genre... Barclay attacks the role with gusto, obviously enjoying her turn as that most pleasurable of cinematic characters, the thoroughly amoral bitch who uses her body to get what she wants, all done with a sparkle in the eye and a sneer on the lips...

Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

In no sense is it a morality tale. Good is never going to triumph because it's clear from the start that its champions aren't up to the job. Steve Bastoni's police detective, the film's main representative of law and order, is as corruptible as everyone else, and well-meaning Lilya is floundering way out of her depth. As for Dianne, her wry fatalism is potently laced with malice. For her, everything flows from the fact that the mother of Katrina and Danny was a drug addict. The film itself doesn't buy into that argument, wisely eschewing pop psychology to let you make up your own mind on the nature-versus-nurture debate. It also raises the distinct possibility that Katrina, as with many of life's mysteries, simply defies explanation....

4.0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

A high-camp vehicle for Barclay's electrifying talent... When you're dealing with a subject as heavy as killing, you need a solid motive. Katrina's isn't explained with any great depth or credibility, and you're left wondering how on earth this bad girl, as magnetic as she is, got away with murder...

3.0
Newshub

Newshub

press

Barclay really stretches her acting legs here and is certainly the best thing about this film, which is mostly patchy.

2.0
Lumiere Reader

Lumiere Reader

press

I like clever and fresh genre reworking – Rian Johnson’s recent teen noir masterpiece Brick is a case in point – but Suburban Mayhem, for all its ballsy ‘fck you’ attitude and pub punk vigour, never quite transcends its sub-iconic exterior. Sure, the present was nicely wrapped, but when I got inside, it wasn’t really what I’d hoped for...

1.0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Not as clever or affecting as it thinks it is...

2.0
BBC

BBC

press

What do you get if you cross Kath And Kim with film noir? The answer is director Paul Goldman's Suburban Mayhem; only, that makes this film sound better than it is. We're in small-town Australia, and rising Kiwi actress Emily Barclay plays 19-year-old Katrina Skinner, an amoral and chain-smoking single-mother, who locals suspect was involved in her father's murder. Cue a hefty dose of black humour. Trouble is, Suburban Mayhem just isn't funny enough, or dark enough, to leave any lasting impression...

2.0
Variety

Variety

press

What starts as a predictably enjoyable ride through the hothouse world of suburbia unexpectedly loses steam half way through "Suburban Mayhem," the latest addition to the gloriously outrageous line of amoral uber-bitches that fails to inject new life into the comic genre... Barclay attacks the role with gusto, obviously enjoying her turn as that most pleasurable of cinematic characters, the thoroughly amoral bitch who uses her body to get what she wants, all done with a sparkle in the eye and a sneer on the lips...

Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

In no sense is it a morality tale. Good is never going to triumph because it's clear from the start that its champions aren't up to the job. Steve Bastoni's police detective, the film's main representative of law and order, is as corruptible as everyone else, and well-meaning Lilya is floundering way out of her depth. As for Dianne, her wry fatalism is potently laced with malice. For her, everything flows from the fact that the mother of Katrina and Danny was a drug addict. The film itself doesn't buy into that argument, wisely eschewing pop psychology to let you make up your own mind on the nature-versus-nurture debate. It also raises the distinct possibility that Katrina, as with many of life's mysteries, simply defies explanation....

4.0
New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

press

A high-camp vehicle for Barclay's electrifying talent... When you're dealing with a subject as heavy as killing, you need a solid motive. Katrina's isn't explained with any great depth or credibility, and you're left wondering how on earth this bad girl, as magnetic as she is, got away with murder...

3.0
Newshub

Newshub

press

Barclay really stretches her acting legs here and is certainly the best thing about this film, which is mostly patchy.

2.0
Lumiere Reader

Lumiere Reader

press

I like clever and fresh genre reworking – Rian Johnson’s recent teen noir masterpiece Brick is a case in point – but Suburban Mayhem, for all its ballsy ‘fck you’ attitude and pub punk vigour, never quite transcends its sub-iconic exterior. Sure, the present was nicely wrapped, but when I got inside, it wasn’t really what I’d hoped for...

1.0
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

press

Not as clever or affecting as it thinks it is...

2.0
BBC

BBC

press

What do you get if you cross Kath And Kim with film noir? The answer is director Paul Goldman's Suburban Mayhem; only, that makes this film sound better than it is. We're in small-town Australia, and rising Kiwi actress Emily Barclay plays 19-year-old Katrina Skinner, an amoral and chain-smoking single-mother, who locals suspect was involved in her father's murder. Cue a hefty dose of black humour. Trouble is, Suburban Mayhem just isn't funny enough, or dark enough, to leave any lasting impression...

2.0

There aren't any user reviews for this movie yet.