Silence

Silence

Silence

Andrew Garfield, Adam Driver, Liam Neeson and Tadanobu Asano (Thor) star in Martin Scorsese's historical drama, based on the novel by Shûsaku Endô. The story follows two Jesuit Portuguese Catholic priests who, travelling in 17th century Japan to spread the teachings of Christianity, face violent persecution.

Scorsese has been developing this project since the early '90s and through the years, the likes of Daniel Day-Lewis and Benicio del Toro have been attached to star.

2016Rating: MA15+, Strong violence161 minsUSA
DramaHistoricalFestival & Independent
Director:
Martin Scorsese ('Wolf of Wall Street', 'Goodfellas', 'The Departed', 'Shutter Island', 'Taxi Driver')
Writer:
Jay Cocks
Cast:
Adam DriverLiam NeesonAndrew GarfieldCiarán HindsTadanobu AsanoShin'ya TsukamotoNana KomatsuRyô Kase

Streaming (6 Providers)

Silence / Reviews

Flicks, Paul Casserly

Flicks, Paul Casserly

As a lapsed Catholic I’m always keen on a tale that documents the folly, arrogance and optimism of religious conversion and missionary zeal, especially in a colonial setting. Also, I like Japanese food and Scorsese pictures so what could go wrong?

Full review
Variety

Variety

A taxing film that will not only hold up to multiple viewings, but practically demands them.

Full review
Total Film

Total Film

Scorsese blends his twin religions of Catholicism and cinema to considerable effect.

Full review
Time Out

Time Out

Scorsese has hit the rare heights of Ingmar Bergman and Carl Theodor Dreyer, artists who found in religion a battleground that often left the strongest in tatters. It's a movie desperately needed at a moment when bluster must yield to self-reflection.

Full review
The New York Times

The New York Times

There's a crushing lack of urgency to this story and its telling, perhaps because it took Mr. Scorsese, who wrote the script with Jay Cocks, so long to make "Silence."

Full review
The Guardian

The Guardian

With ambition and reach, and often a real dramatic grandeur, Scorsese's film has addressed the imperial crisis of Christian evangelists with stamina, seriousness and a gusto comparable to David Lean's.

Full review
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

This anguished, contemplative new movie, which [Scorsese] spent nearly three decades coaxing into celluloid reality, carries the weight of a career summation.

Full review
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

...of his [Scorsese's] explicitly religious dramas, specifically including Kundun and The Last Temptation of Christ, this is, by a considerable distance, the most eloquent and coherent.

Full review
FilmInk

FilmInk

It's rather less than the sum of its parts, but some of those parts are magnificent.

Full review
Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Less showy than The Last Temptation Of Christ, more gripping than Kundun, the third part of Scorsese's unofficial 'religious' trilogy is beautifully made, staggeringly ambitious and utterly compelling.

Full review