Green Room

Green Room

Green Room

The director of cult hit Blue Ruin casts Patrick Stewart as a ruthless neo-Nazi in this confined-space thriller, targeting an innocent indie punk band who saw something they can't unsee.

Down on their luck rockers The Ain’t Rights are finishing up a long and unsuccessful tour, and are about to call it quits when they get an unexpected booking at an isolated, run-down club deep in the backwoods of Oregon. What seems a third-rate gig escalates into something much more sinister when they witness an act of violence backstage that they weren’t meant to see.

Now trapped backstage, they must face off against the club’s depraved owner, Darcy (Stewart), a man who will do anything to protect the secrets of his nefarious enterprise. But while Darcy and his henchmen think the band will be easy to get rid of, The Ain’t Rights prove themselves much more cunning and capable than anyone expected, turning the tables on their unsuspecting captors and setting the stage for the ultimate life-or-death showdown.

Audience Award winner at Austin Fantastic Fest 2015; Third Place, People's Choice Award at Toronto International Film Festival 2015
2015Rating: R18+, High impact violence95 minsUSA
HorrorThriller

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Green Room / Reviews

Flicks, Matt Glasby

Flicks, Matt Glasby

Punk rock and horror should go hand-in-hand – both need to be loud, fast and resolutely NSFW – but often the results are embarrassing. Just as writer/director Jeremy Saulnier brought humanity back to the revenge flick in 2013's Blue Ruin, here he brings proper scares and smarts to the punk-horror subgenre.

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Variety

Variety

Characterization and emotional investment are in disappointingly short supply, while crucial tension is permitted to dissipate in an anti-climactic final third.

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Time Out

Time Out

This is a brutal movie that finds unusual freedom in limitations...

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The Guardian

The Guardian

Saulnier’s ability to take a well-trodden road and fill it with grisly surprises is quite something.

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Stuff

Stuff

If you like your movies – and your music – nasty, brutish and short, but never gratuitous, then Green Room is for you.

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Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

Way more than crass exploitation. It's a B movie with an art-house core.

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New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

An electrifying genre-bending blast.

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Little White Lies

Little White Lies

It's all put together with great skill, but never quite manages to deliver more than its modest, stripped-back story will allow.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

As action, it's niftily executed, the suspense neatly built, and the shocks expectedly surprising.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

A riotous, rough-hewn and rousing punk reinvention of ’70s-style grindhouse exploitation-with-a-brain-cinema.

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