Crooked House (2017)

Crooked House (2017)

(2017)

Max Irons (The Host) leads an all-star cast featuring Glenn Close and Gillian Anderson in this screen adaptation of the Agatha Christie mystery novel.... More

Private detective Charles Hayward (Irons) is invited to solve a gruesome crime where nobody is above suspicion, including Sophia (Stefanie Martini, TV's Emerald City), his client and former lover.Hide

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The Peoples' Reviews

Average ratings from 4 ratings, 2 reviews
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BY KSS wannabe

Noir-style mystery with plenty of red herrings.


I need to like my characters or at least something about them. The ending is shocking but nothing I didn't see coming. Lots of interesting characters but I just didn't give a toss for any of them. Now if it had ended with the crooked house being turned into a raging inferno which killed off all of them , I would have dragged out the marshmallows on sticks with glee.


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The Press Reviews

  • A visual treat but a less-than-tantalising mystery. Full Review

  • Irons more than holds his own at the centre of this swirling mystery, and Martini proves an enchanting leading lady, but the real draws are Close and Anderson, who bring a ferocious zest to their over-the-top characters. Full Review

  • The superb cast provides mild pleasures, as do some aspects of the elaborate mystery itself. Full Review

  • "Crooked House" keeps you guessing, right up to its shocking conclusion (of which Christie was especially proud, naming it a personal favorite among her extensive oeuvre). Full Review

  • Crooked House knows what its job is: to set up a tangled web of colourful characters, throw in a few red herrings, set off its dynamite, and make its exit while the smoke is still in the air. Full Review

  • All in all, a hugely enjoyable, sumptuous adaptation that, while never attempting to break the Christie mould, imbued the story with a pleasingly contemporary feel. Full Review

  • Succeeds where recent adaptations, such as Kenneth Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express, failed: the how is just as important as the who. Full Review