Vacancy

Vacancy

Vacancy

When David (Luke Wilson) and Amy Fox's (Kate Beckinsale) car breaks down in the middle of nowhere, they are forced to spend the night at the only motel around, with only the TV to entertain them… until they discover that the low-budget slasher movies they're watching were all filmed in the very room they're sitting in.

With hidden cameras now aimed at them… trapping them in room, crawlspaces, underground tunnels… and now filming their every move, David and Amy must struggle to get out alive before whomever is watching them can finish their latest snuff masterpiece.

200780 minsUSA
Thriller

Streaming (2 Providers)

Reviews & comments

too scary to watch alone

3.0
Village Voice

Village Voice

press

Antal smartly adheres to the no-frills demands of B-movie horror, eliciting impressive chills from old-fashioned suffocating dread rather than the now usual gore. And Wilson and Beckinsale superbly execute everything that's required of their characters--namely, yelling and running...

Variety

Variety

press

At the risk of spoiling anything, Vacancy, is one strange movie. It ends so precipitously, one can only assume it's a setup for the sequel (which, given all that happens, seems a mite unlikely)...

The New York Times

The New York Times

press

This banal horror retread involves a couple of critters flailing inside a sticky trap for what is, in effect, the big-screen equivalent of a roach motel...

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A ruthlessly efficient stalk-and-slash machine...

BBC

BBC

press

Vacancy scores points early on by ignoring the usual safety zones. Antal piles on the suspense with an expert's touch, even coaxing a panting, panicked performance from Beckinsale. Best of all is the helmer's willingness to drag the grubby spirit of '80s video nasties into the sanitised, air-conditioned confines of the multiplex. His grainy snuff showreels - movies within the movie we never get a proper look at - are disturbingly authentic, hinting that Vacancy might be much darker than expected. Of course, it's a red herring and it's not long before Antal's nerve fails him with a spectacular switchback that will have any self-respecting horror fan screaming (at the screen, in disgust)...

2.0
Village Voice

Village Voice

press

Antal smartly adheres to the no-frills demands of B-movie horror, eliciting impressive chills from old-fashioned suffocating dread rather than the now usual gore. And Wilson and Beckinsale superbly execute everything that's required of their characters--namely, yelling and running...

Variety

Variety

press

At the risk of spoiling anything, Vacancy, is one strange movie. It ends so precipitously, one can only assume it's a setup for the sequel (which, given all that happens, seems a mite unlikely)...

The New York Times

The New York Times

press

This banal horror retread involves a couple of critters flailing inside a sticky trap for what is, in effect, the big-screen equivalent of a roach motel...

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A ruthlessly efficient stalk-and-slash machine...

BBC

BBC

press

Vacancy scores points early on by ignoring the usual safety zones. Antal piles on the suspense with an expert's touch, even coaxing a panting, panicked performance from Beckinsale. Best of all is the helmer's willingness to drag the grubby spirit of '80s video nasties into the sanitised, air-conditioned confines of the multiplex. His grainy snuff showreels - movies within the movie we never get a proper look at - are disturbingly authentic, hinting that Vacancy might be much darker than expected. Of course, it's a red herring and it's not long before Antal's nerve fails him with a spectacular switchback that will have any self-respecting horror fan screaming (at the screen, in disgust)...

2.0

too scary to watch alone

3.0