The King's Speech

The King's Speech

The King's Speech

The big winner at the 2011 Academy Awards (Best Film, Actor, Director and Screenplay), The King's Speech stars Helena Bonham Carter as Queen Elizabeth, Colin Firth as King George VI, and also starring Geoffrey Rush, Guy Pearce and Michael Gambon.

Tells the story of King George VI, the father of Queen Elizabeth II. After his brother abdicates, George reluctantly assumes the throne. Plagued by a dreaded stutter and considered unfit to be King, he engages the help of an unorthodox speech therapist named Lionel Logue (Rush). Through his friendship with Logue, George finds his voice and confidence, and leads Britain into World War II.

Winner of Best Film, Director, Actor (Colin Firth) and Screenplay at the 2011 Academy Awards. Winner of 7 BAFTA Awards 2011 including Best Film, Best Actor (Firth), Best Supporting Actress (Bonham Carter), Best Supporting Actor (Rush) and Best Screenplay. Winner for Best Actor, Drama (Firth) at the 2011 Golden Globes. Audience Award winner at Toronto Film Festival 2010.
2010Rating: M, for some language118 minsUK, Australia
DramaHistorical

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The King's Speech / Reviews

Variety

Variety

While far from easy, both roles provide a delightful opportunity for Firth and Rush to poke a bit of fun at their profession.

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Total Film

Total Film

If The King’s Speech doesn’t bring him the Oscar he just missed for that role, it’ll be a royal scandal.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

That film does have its attractions, notably in its two solid leads and standout support from Mr. Pearce.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

This handsome movie about the abdication crisis and George VI's stammer is a clever anti-Pygmalion

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Roger Ebert

Roger Ebert

What we have here is a superior historical drama and a powerful personal one.

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Little White Lies

Little White Lies

The piano refrain that opens The King’s Speech tells you to expect a film that prizes respectability above all else. And yet almost imperceptibly, something shifts in Tom Hooper’s period comedy.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

It perhaps started with "The Queen," continued with "Young Victoria" and now achieves the most intimate glimpse inside the royal camp to date with The King's Speech.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Think the blazing joys of "Chariots Of Fire" where the race is to the end of a sentence. Can it be that the British are coming?

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Christchurch Press

Christchurch Press

The King's Speech wins out with vivid dialogue and great cast

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