The Kingmaker

The Kingmaker

The Kingmaker

Filmmaker Lauren Greenfield (The Queen of Versailles) continues her exploration of extreme wealth with the most political work of her career. The Kingmaker centers on the indomitable character of billionaire Filipino politician Imelda Marcos.

Explores the disturbing legacy of the Marcos regime and Imelda's present-day push to help her son, Bongbong, win the vice-presidency. To this end, Imelda rewrites her family's history of corruption, replacing it with a narrative of a matriarch's extravagant love for her country. In an age when fake news manipulates elections, Imelda's comeback story serves as a dark fairy tale.

2019100 minsUSAFilipino with English subtitles
Documentary
Director:
Lauren Greenfield ('The Queen of Versailles', 'Generation Wealth')
Cast:
Imelda Marcos

Streaming (1 Providers)

The Kingmaker / Reviews

Wall Street Journal

Wall Street Journal

A picture of excess, both financial and political.

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Variety

Variety

In light of the recurring themes of Greenfield’s oeuvre — decades spent documenting the lifestyles of the filthy rich and wannabe famous, à la “The Queen of Versailles” and “Generation Wealth” — it’s no wonder that Marcos would be amenable to being immortalized by such a high-profile photographer. What Greenfield’s subjects never seem to grasp is how her work manages to flatter them, captured in all their blinged-out excess, while striking outsiders as satirical and shocking.

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

The access is impeccable but in Lauren Greenfield’s hands, The Kingmaker never feels like hagiography, the sly character assassination and political edge remaining sharp.

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Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

Starts as a portrait and ends as a nonfiction political horror movie.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

As Greenfield opens “The Kingmaker” up, the Philippines’ past and present move uneasily into alignment, and the movie becomes more interesting and far more disturbing. Notably, it also becomes less about one woman, her malevolent charms and quirks, and develops into an unsettling look at imperial power.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post

Chills the soul by presenting shantytown residents and school kids who extol the Marcos regime and even endorse its eight-year period of martial law. Imelda Marcos is not the mother of all Filipinos, but some of them are happy to proclaim themselves her children.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

The former first lady of the Philippines is revealed as a monstrous, loathsome, absurdly queenly figure in Lauren Greenfield’s superb documentary

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