The Hundred-Foot Journey

The Hundred-Foot Journey

The Hundred-Foot Journey

Director Lasse Hallström's (Chocolat) adaptation of the Richard C. Morais novel about the rivalry between an Indian restaurant that is 100 feet away from a three-Michelin-star-hunting bistro in the south of France. Produced by Steven Spielberg and Oprah Winfrey, starring Oscar-winner Helen Mirren (The Queen).

A young immigrant named Hassan (Manish Dayal, Breaking The Girls) and his father (Om Puri, Ghandi) open an Indian restaurant in Saint-Antonin-Noble-Val in the south of France. Hassan - a gifted chef - must win over the eccentric Madame Mallory (Mirren), the head chef at the revered Le Saule Pleureur bistro.

2014Rating: PG122 minsUSA
ComedyDrama
Director:
Lasse Hallström ('Chocolat', 'What's Eating Gilbert Grape', 'The Cider House Rules')
Writer:
Steven Knight
Cast:
Helen MirrenManish DayalOm Puri

Streaming (3 Providers)

The Hundred-Foot Journey / Reviews

Flicks, Liam Maguren

Flicks, Liam Maguren

Often with foodie films, the filmmakers treat the on-screen dishes like Michael Bay treats women: they tart the subject up and use glistening gratuitous close-ups with the intention of making the audience drool. But in this adaptation of Richard C. Morais’ novel, Chocolat director Lasse Hallström isn’t as interested in food porn as he is in food romanticism.

Full review
Variety

Variety

It contrasts the heat and intensity of Indian cooking with the elegance and refinement of French haute cuisine, then balances the two with a feel-good lesson in ethnic harmony.

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Time Out

Time Out

The movie’s never tastier than when screen vets Mirren and Puri are sparring, pettily buying out each other’s produce at the local market or bellyaching to the town’s mayor.

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The New York Times

The New York Times

Is likely neither to pique your appetite nor to sate it, leaving you in a dyspeptic limbo, stuffed with false sentiment and forced whimsy.

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The Dissolve

The Dissolve

A film that telegraphs all its beats and character arcs, executes them adequately but without passion or personality, then congratulates itself on a job done.

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Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

When it comes to character development, Manish Dayal, as Hassan, and Le Bon are sold short, landed with thankless, undeveloped roles.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Colorful locales and exotic spices can't hide its essential blandness.

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Herald Sun

Herald Sun

It is the film's winning collection of wonderful characters that will truly satisfy all tastes.

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