Slam (2018)

Slam (2018)

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Slam (2018)

A Muslim activist and slam poet goes missing in this Sydney-set mystery by Partho Sen-Gupta that explores Islamophobia in Australia.

"Adam Bakri (Omar) stars as Ricky, a Sydney café owner and Muslim refugee who is proudly assimilated into Australian culture. Ricky is estranged from his sister Ameena (Danielle Horvat), a hijab-wearing, politicised slam poet who is unafraid to air her views on Australian society. When Ameena disappears after a gig one night, Ricky is forced to revisit his internal conflicts over his own identity as he and his mother desperately search for her. When the right-wing media seizes on the story, speculating that Ameena has fled the country to join the Islamic State, the family suffers a barrage of scrutiny – even as they fear it could be true." (Sydney Film Festival)

2018Rating: MA15+, Strong coarse language116 minsAustralia, France
DramaFestival & Independent
50%
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Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

Each plot strand echoes and illuminates the rest, mirroring the heightened tensions that took hold in so many Muslim enclaves in the West post-9/11. It all adds up to a telling indictment of the tyrannous effect of the 24-hour news cycle.

4.0
0
FilmInk

FilmInk

press

As with the director’s previous film, Sunrise (2014), the hero’s journey is a tormented one. We cannot but feel for Ricky’s plight, but it is not always easy to be in his company. Bakri (who was so good in the arthouse hit Omar (2013)) doesn’t have that much dialogue and is here required to communicate his character’s narrative mostly through his facial expressions. Still, the message that ethnocentrism blights aspects of contemporary Australia comes across loud and clear.

0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

Each plot strand echoes and illuminates the rest, mirroring the heightened tensions that took hold in so many Muslim enclaves in the West post-9/11. It all adds up to a telling indictment of the tyrannous effect of the 24-hour news cycle.

4.0
0
FilmInk

FilmInk

press

As with the director’s previous film, Sunrise (2014), the hero’s journey is a tormented one. We cannot but feel for Ricky’s plight, but it is not always easy to be in his company. Bakri (who was so good in the arthouse hit Omar (2013)) doesn’t have that much dialogue and is here required to communicate his character’s narrative mostly through his facial expressions. Still, the message that ethnocentrism blights aspects of contemporary Australia comes across loud and clear.

0

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