Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Review: Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Mriceguy
By Mriceguy
19 Aug 19

Once Upon A Time In Hollywood No stranger to rewriting history, Tarantino takes on the Manson murders but it really is just a mere backdrop for what is a trip through the golden age of Hollywood with literal recreations of old film and television. Starring Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio; a veritable dream team of Hollywood heartthrobs and neither of whom is a stranger to the Tarantinoverse. We have a snivelling DiCaprio as Rick Dalton, a fictional Hollywood actor famous for a Western television show who has now fallen from a leading man to taking on cameo villain roles. Pitt is Cliff Dalton, a cool, calm and collected stuntman for Dalton and he's never looked hotter. 55 years old for goodness sakes. Margot Robbie portrays real actress, Sharon Tate, but spends most of the film disconnected from our duo and the main plot—an ethereal angel floating throughout Hollywood, observing herself as the world sees her. My favourite piece of cameo casting would have to be Timothy Olyphant as the stock hero in a Western opposite DiCaprio. No stranger to the TV Western, Olyphant takes up the literal reigns once again, having previously starred in HBO's Deadwood and a more modern Western in FX's Justified. Tarantino lets this film bloat, with extensive scenes of characters driving from A to B. It's merely an excuse to explore 1969 LA and a bit of easy breezy fun but I reckon you could still chop this film up and still have room to breathe. For a film based around a cult of murderers it's a pretty relaxed affair. Tarantino is known for his use of violence and you might be forgiven for thinking he's lost his meanstreak here. But it does eventually escalate and boy does it escalate. That all being said, the misogyny in this film is pretty hard to miss. And it's not just the treatment of Sharon Tate. Women are objects without agency; seen through a male lens as the camera traverses their bodies. Women are made out to be 'hysterical' and brutally murdered for laughs. Yes 1969 was a different time but this movie came out in 2019 and still fantasizes about a time of hyper masculinity where men where men and women were seen and not heard. As lightly enjoyable as it was, for me anyway, this film serves as a jumping off point to learn about the real history of Hollywood and not a history romanticised or rewritten.
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Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

Once Upon a Time in Hollywood

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