My Name Is Pauli Murray

My Name Is Pauli Murray

My Name Is Pauli Murray

The filmmakers behind Oscar-nominated doco RBG depict the life of Pauli Murray, a hugely influential figure overlooked by history who faught for gender equality and civil rights. A non-binary Black luminary, Murray's impact inspired the likes of Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Thurgood Marshall.

2021Rating: PG-1391 mins
DocumentaryHistorical

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My Name Is Pauli Murray / Reviews

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

A must-see doc about a must-know subject.

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Variety

Variety

Intricately crafted without being flashy, the Sundance-launched documentary trusts that its subject can hold her own. Murray does far more than that.

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San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle

An extraordinary documentary about an underrated civil rights giant who was way ahead of her time...

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Stuff

Stuff

A breathtaking work of historical journalism...

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The New York Times

The New York Times

The filmmakers touch on more compelling themes than in their Ginsburg hagiography, RBG... But the result feels an awful lot like an illustrated textbook.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

It is something of a shame... that this extraordinary story of an extraordinary person is told via bland film-making...

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RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

My Name is Pauli Murray creates a rich portrait of... an intricate figure.

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The Washington Post

The Washington Post

My Name is Pauli Murray delivers a lively, revelatory litany of all the things Murray got right first, in a career that was driven by equal parts intellectual curiosity and call to service.

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Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

It does a terrific job of making amends, helped by a wealth of archival footage drawn from Murray's public and personal life.

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Chicago Reader

Chicago Reader

Betsy West and Julie Cohen’s film cements Murray’s legacy.

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Too often, Cohen and West's film falls short of mirroring the energy and resilience of Murray herself.

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