Music

Music

Music

Zu (Kate Hudson), a free spirit estranged from her family, suddenly finds herself the sole guardian of her teenage half-sister, Music (Maddie Ziegler) in this musical drama co-written and directed by singer-songwriter Sia. 

2021Rating: M, Mature themes, violence and coarse language107 minsUSA
DramaMusical

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Music / Reviews

Salon

Salon

I am autistic and a fan of Sia's songs. As I watched her feature directorial debut "Music," I felt overwhelmed with emotions . . . none of them good.

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Chicago Sun-Times

Chicago Sun-Times

Jaw-dropping train wreck...

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The New York Times

The New York Times

This is a bizarre movie, one that parades confused ideas about care, fantasy and disability with a pride that reads as vanity.

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Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

A sentimental atrocity so cringe-inducing it should come with an advisory warning for anyone with pre-existing shoulder or back injuries.

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Variety

Variety

Kate Hudson's excellent performance as a recovering alcoholic goes a good way toward grounding a bifurcated movie musical that doesn't have its treatment of autism as its only problem.

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RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

If not for its game ensemble cast and a few memorable moments (including a cameo by Juliette Lewis), it should be counted as a disaster.

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The Guardian

The Guardian

[Ziegler's] distracting performance feels ill-judged at best, and lacks the support of a credible, nuanced drama to help it resonate.

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Time Out

Time Out

A well-intentioned but messily fantastical neurodiversity drama.

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Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

May lack the sickening nightmare quality of Tom Hooper’s screen version of Cats – apparently set in some version of hell – it’s scarcely less of a baffling fiasco, and may inspire a similar cult of ironic enthusiasts who return repeatedly to gawk at the wreckage.

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The Age

The Age

The equivalent to a pop-up bar furnished with hastily assembled knick-knacks from the 1990s, in desperate hope we might assume the randomness was somehow by design. Utterly consistent, however, is the commitment to cloying whimsy.

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