Marie Antoinette

Marie Antoinette

Marie Antoinette

Sofia Coppola's follow up to Lost In Translation is a historical drama/comedy about the ill-fated Queen of France. Antionette (Kirsten Dunst) was the famously frivolous and naive Austrian who, in 1774, became queen of France at age 19. She married an indifferent Louis XVI (Jason Schwartzman), who was much unprepared for the woes of politics.

Winner for Best Costume Design at the 2007 Academy Awards.
2006Rating: PG, Mild themes, Mild sexual references123 minsUSA
ComedyDrama

Streaming (3 Providers)

Marie Antoinette / Reviews

Variety

Variety

The writer-director's follow-up to her breakthrough second feature, "Lost in Translation," is no more nourishing than a bonbon...

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The New Yorker

The New Yorker

Anything that rattles the ashtrays of French film critics has got to be seen...

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San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle

But with "Marie Antoinette," Coppola offers only a handsome style piece in its place, lacking in wit or real significance...

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Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

But Coppola sees more in Marie than an Old World Paris Hilton. By tossing in American slang, rock music (New Order and Bow Wow Wow) and eclectic acting styles, she's crashing through the barriers of centuries and stuffy Hollywood biopics to give us a palpable sense of Marie moving through the temptations of flesh and spirit before history boxed her in. With lyrical intelligence and scrappy wit, Coppola creates a luscious world to get lost in. It's a pleasure...

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New Zealand Herald

New Zealand Herald

The use of music from artists such as Bow Wow Wow, The Cure and The Strokes at times comes across as inspired, and at other times as jarring and out of place. This pretty much sums up the film. At times it works, at times it doesn't. Marie Antoinette is not driven by story; there are periods where nothing happens. Instead, Coppola has presented a visual feast for those who are happy to look dreamily at clothes, shoes and decors for a couple of hours...

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

Marie Antoinette gives a wide berth to the conventions of period dramas, especially their time-capsule remove, and instead tries to mainline the singular personal experience of the arch-villainess of French history (and freedom history, for that matter). The result is a startlingly original and beautiful pop reverie that comes very close to being transcendent...

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Empire Magazine

Empire Magazine

Marie Antoinette is gorgeous, giddy, gilded filmmaking...

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