In Fabric

In Fabric

In Fabric

In an eerie department store, a cursed dress passes from person to person, corrupting their lives in this surreal horror from Peter Strickland (Berberian Sound Studio).

During a wintertime sale, a sinister sales-matron (Fatma Mohamed) introduces customers to a scarlet garment with ill intent - overseen by a pair of bureaucrats (Steve Oram and The Mighty Boosh's Julian Barratt). Co-stars Gwendoline Christie, Sidse Babett Knudsen (Strickland's The Duke of Burgundy) and Marianne Jean-Baptiste.

2018Rating: MA15+, Strong supernatural themes, sex and nudity118 minsUK
HorrorFestival & Independent

Streaming (2 Providers)

Reviews & comments

Flicks

Flicks, Steve Newall

flicks

Peter Strickland’s latest is also his outright funniest, not lacking in the ultra-stylised look of previous outings Berberian Sound Studio and The Duke of Burgundy, but also not shy about tons of outright gags to sit alongside some of the can’t-help-but-laugh absurdity. Fatma Mohamed is a deadpan revelation as department store sales assistant/occult something-or-other Miss Luckmoore, whose virtually every utterance or facial expression brought the house down. A bonkers crowdpleaser (bonkers film or audience, you be the judge) from a filmmaker who evidently has something against bosses, who vary here from friendly-oppressive to outright-oppressive—or jizzing across the screen while watching… you’ll see.

5.0

In Fabric is perplexing, bizarre, eclectic and quite spooky on the whole, honouring several classic horror titles. The first act (or two) with Marianne Jean-Baptiste's Sheila offers the most variety and study of an intriguing character beyond the scares (and surprising bouts of comedy) which are delivered in the periphery.

4.0

Killer Fashion

I’m not a fan of Peter Strickland’s previous films, but his latest lands with delightfully bonkers aplomb. A stylish, perverse and often hilarious collision of genres, fetishism and, um, killer fashion.

4.0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

This is a film with a split personality: the notion of beauty as evil is partly tongue-in-cheek and partly not, as if Strickland were asking himself, guiltily, “Ought I to be an artist?” The question, however, may be premature depending on whether you think he is one.

The New York Times

The New York Times

press

The film spaces out several nasty and effective frights. And as its narrative seems to deliberately devolve into a dissociative dream, even the funny material hits with a choke in the throat.

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

I can imagine Rick Wakeman turning this film into a triple concept album or a character in a Jonathan Coe novel becoming obsessed with it.

4.0
Time Out

Time Out

press

If you haven't yet guessed, Strickland's real terror concerns our addiction to buying things, and In Fabric goes way beyond zombies in a mall.

5.0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A movie of ravishing colours and textures that ultimately elevates style and sensuality into something genuinely meaningful.

Variety

Variety

press

The overall exercise is so captivating - despite its taxingly slow pace - that audiences naturally reorient themselves to see where Strickland will take them next.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

The conceit (killer couture!) is only as good as its context, and this is where In Fabric excels.

FilmInk

FilmInk

press

…a beautifully realised film that engages with the true potentials of contemporary cinema.

Flicks

Flicks, Steve Newall

flicks

Peter Strickland’s latest is also his outright funniest, not lacking in the ultra-stylised look of previous outings Berberian Sound Studio and The Duke of Burgundy, but also not shy about tons of outright gags to sit alongside some of the can’t-help-but-laugh absurdity. Fatma Mohamed is a deadpan revelation as department store sales assistant/occult something-or-other Miss Luckmoore, whose virtually every utterance or facial expression brought the house down. A bonkers crowdpleaser (bonkers film or audience, you be the judge) from a filmmaker who evidently has something against bosses, who vary here from friendly-oppressive to outright-oppressive—or jizzing across the screen while watching… you’ll see.

5.0
Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

This is a film with a split personality: the notion of beauty as evil is partly tongue-in-cheek and partly not, as if Strickland were asking himself, guiltily, “Ought I to be an artist?” The question, however, may be premature depending on whether you think he is one.

The New York Times

The New York Times

press

The film spaces out several nasty and effective frights. And as its narrative seems to deliberately devolve into a dissociative dream, even the funny material hits with a choke in the throat.

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

I can imagine Rick Wakeman turning this film into a triple concept album or a character in a Jonathan Coe novel becoming obsessed with it.

4.0
Time Out

Time Out

press

If you haven't yet guessed, Strickland's real terror concerns our addiction to buying things, and In Fabric goes way beyond zombies in a mall.

5.0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A movie of ravishing colours and textures that ultimately elevates style and sensuality into something genuinely meaningful.

Variety

Variety

press

The overall exercise is so captivating - despite its taxingly slow pace - that audiences naturally reorient themselves to see where Strickland will take them next.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

The conceit (killer couture!) is only as good as its context, and this is where In Fabric excels.

FilmInk

FilmInk

press

…a beautifully realised film that engages with the true potentials of contemporary cinema.

In Fabric is perplexing, bizarre, eclectic and quite spooky on the whole, honouring several classic horror titles. The first act (or two) with Marianne Jean-Baptiste's Sheila offers the most variety and study of an intriguing character beyond the scares (and surprising bouts of comedy) which are delivered in the periphery.

4.0

Killer Fashion

I’m not a fan of Peter Strickland’s previous films, but his latest lands with delightfully bonkers aplomb. A stylish, perverse and often hilarious collision of genres, fetishism and, um, killer fashion.

4.0