Goodbye to Language

Goodbye to Language

Poster for Goodbye to Language

French New Wave grandmaster Jean-Luc Godard brings this hyper, 3D, digital video commentary on relationships, language and the possibilities of the image. Says The Times: "Visually, it is the most daring film in competition [at Cannes 2014] - not bad for an enfant terrible aged 83." More

"The idea is simple: A married woman and a single man meet. They love, they argue, fists fly. A dog strays between town and country. The seasons pass. The man and woman meet again. The dog finds itself between them. The other is in one, the one is in the other and they are three. The former husband shatters everything. A second film begins: the same as the first, and yet not. From the human race we pass to metaphor. This ends in barking and a baby's cries. In the meantime, we will have seen people talking of the demise of the dollar, of truth in mathematics and of the death of a robin." (Cannes Film Festival)

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2014Rating: R18+70 minsFranceFrench and Italian with English subtitles
Drama3DWorld Cinema
Director:
Jean-Luc Godard ('Breathless', 'Pierrot le fou', 'Bande à part', ''Masculin féminin')
Writer:
Jean-Luc Godard
Cast:
Héloise GodetKamel AbdeliRichard ChevallierZoé BruneauChristian GregoriJessica Erickson

Goodbye to Language | Awards

Award Winner
Jury Prize winner at Cannes Film Festival 2014

Goodbye to Language | Reviews

88%78 reviews

Rotten Tomatoes® Score

All reviews on Rotten Tomatoes
Variety

Variety

For 69 densely packed minutes that feel like an adrenaline shot to the brain... continually reaffirms that no single filmmaker has done more to test and reassert the possibilities of the moving image during the last half-century of the art form.

Full review
The Guardian

The Guardian

The latest from the great director features a keynote turn from his own mutt, Miéville, erratic edits, an incomprehensible plot, mesmeric moments and a reassuringly idiosyncratic world-view

Full review
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

Cobbling together fragments of images, sound, music and words in ways that evince no surface logic and are often grating (probably intentionally) in how they interact... one of the last lions of the French New Wave still standing, recognizably himself but arguably less coherent in intent.

Full review

Goodbye to Language | Release Details

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