Everyone Else

Everyone Else

Everyone Else

A couple's relationship is tested as they bond with another couple on a Mediterranean holiday in this German drama from Maren Ade (Toni Erdmann).

"This film tells the story of Gitti and Chris, an odd couple who are battling their way through a holiday of secluded togetherness. It is an intimate portrait of two people as they can only be when alone: their secret rituals, their silliness, their unfulfilled dreams and their power struggles. A seemingly unimportant event – an encounter with another couple – serves to destabilise their relationship. Not only is the other couple more successful, the two also manage to conceal conventional gender roles beneath a modern façade. Taking a leaf out of the other couple’s book, Chris begins to show his wilful girlfriend who’s boss, with the result that Gitti’s faith in her partner takes a hard knock. She attempts to conform to his new ideal, but what begins as a playful experiment with a new role soon turns into a quiet struggle with her own personality. Although Chris begins to flourish in his role as the stronger of the two, and Gitti begins to loosen up in a completely new way, they are both in danger of losing themselves." (Berlin International Film Festival)

Winner of the Femina-Film-Prize for Production Design (Silke Fischer) and the Silver Berlin Bear Jury Grand Prix (Ade, tied with Giant), 2009 Berlin International Film Festival
2009Rating: MA15+, Strong sex scenes119 minsGermanyGermany and Italian with English subtitles
DramaRomanceWorld Cinema
100%
want to see

Reviews & comments

Village Voice

Village Voice

press

More fascinating than enjoyable. Placing a youngish, newly formed couple under relentless observation, Ade's two-hour squirmathon gets a bit more intimate on the subject of intimacy than the viewer might wish.

0
Variety

Variety

press

But by the second reel it becomes clear that writer-director Maren Ade’s sophomore feature (following her promising debut, “The Forest for the Trees”) is simply fuzzy filmmaking of the worst sort.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

Everyone Else's power comes from the accrual of seemingly disparate incidents; a multifaceted portrait of the duo (and a larger examination of the ins and outs of any relationship) emerges amid all the sex, fighting, affection and insults.

3.0
0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Ms. Ade doesn't pretend to have an answer to our most profound questions about love in her plaintive scenes from a romance. But the wonderful last line - "look at me" - suggests one place to start.

0
Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

press

Ade has an intense affinity for authentic, natural moments of interpersonal disintegration that’s miles above that other 2009 festival movie about love on the rocks.

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A film that unsettles as often as it seduces, though it does very well with both.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Some might find the pacing a little slow, but patient viewers will be amply rewarded by the truth of the details this talented director has amassed over the course of the film's two-hour running time.

0
Village Voice

Village Voice

press

More fascinating than enjoyable. Placing a youngish, newly formed couple under relentless observation, Ade's two-hour squirmathon gets a bit more intimate on the subject of intimacy than the viewer might wish.

0
Variety

Variety

press

But by the second reel it becomes clear that writer-director Maren Ade’s sophomore feature (following her promising debut, “The Forest for the Trees”) is simply fuzzy filmmaking of the worst sort.

0
Time Out

Time Out

press

Everyone Else's power comes from the accrual of seemingly disparate incidents; a multifaceted portrait of the duo (and a larger examination of the ins and outs of any relationship) emerges amid all the sex, fighting, affection and insults.

3.0
0
The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Ms. Ade doesn't pretend to have an answer to our most profound questions about love in her plaintive scenes from a romance. But the wonderful last line - "look at me" - suggests one place to start.

0
Slant Magazine

Slant Magazine

press

Ade has an intense affinity for authentic, natural moments of interpersonal disintegration that’s miles above that other 2009 festival movie about love on the rocks.

0
Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

A film that unsettles as often as it seduces, though it does very well with both.

0
Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Some might find the pacing a little slow, but patient viewers will be amply rewarded by the truth of the details this talented director has amassed over the course of the film's two-hour running time.

0

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