Day Watch

Day Watch

Day Watch

The second instalment of Timur Bekmambetov’s hot-blooded Russian vampire trilogy will need no introduction to fans of its equally hallucinogenic predecessor ‘Night Watch’. Both films burs with hyperkinetic wizardry and are set in a decaying, post-communist Russia.

Reuniting original cast and crew, ‘Day’ follows ‘Night’ where the latter left off, with a suitably complex plot involving Light Other Anton (Khabensky) and his sidekick Svetlana (Poroshina), who may or may not be the greatest Light Other [the ‘goodies’] the world has ever seen. They both work for Night Watch, a quasi-police organisation charged with keeping an eye on the always-Machiavellian movements of the Dark Others (a motley tribe of blood sucking vampires, shape-shifters, witches and warlocks) who operate a similarly vigilant Day Watch. In this episode, whoever gets hold of the Chalk of Destiny – which Anton used to devastating but unwitting effect in Night Watch – will be able to literally rewrite history. The sequel feels beefier, flashier and more sure of its grungy aesthetic (no doubt in part due to Fox’s acquisition of the trilogy) without losing the trademark Russian quirks and interactive subtitles that made the original so unique and appealing.

2007132 minsRussiaRussian with English subtitles
ActionFantasyHorror

Streaming (3 Providers)

Day Watch / Reviews

Variety

Variety

Bursting with incident and FX, "Day Watch" will delight fans of its predecessor, "Night Watch," but further annoy those antipathetic to the Russkie-made supernatural franchise. Although more flashily assembled, pic's relentless onslaught charms less over a running time almost 25 minutes longer...

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The New York Times

The New York Times

Unfolding in a decrepit, present-day Moscow, “Day Watch” dazzles and confuses with equal determination. Less coherent than its predecessor, if equally creative, the movie depicts hidden dimensions teeming with beings who transform into clouds of mosquitoes, swap bodies at will and rewrite destiny with something called the Chalk of Fate...

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Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

A satisfying continuation of the planned trilogy, a highly-caffeinated assault on our senses by writer-director Timur Bekmambetov that advances the story while upping the ante on action and effects...

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