Children of the Silk Road

Children of the Silk Road

Children of the Silk Road

In 1930s China, Brit journo George Hogg (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) heads into the heart of the war with Japan. After almost being beheaded in Nanjing, he finds himself reluctantly babysitting a group of orphaned schoolboys in the mountains and falling for their nurse. As the danger of war closes in, Hogg realises he must lead the children 700 miles to safety.

Based on a true story. New Zealander Rewi Alley was the actual hero, but in the film his British counterpart George Hogg takes the limelight. Alley was possibly written out for political reasons - he was a communist and rumoured to be gay.

2007114 minsAustralia, China, Germany
DramaTrue Story & BiographyHistorical

Streaming (1 Providers)

Reviews & comments

Flicks, Team

Flicks, Team

flicks

In 1930s China, Brit journo George Hogg (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) heads into the heart of the war with Japan. After almost being beheaded in Nanjing, he finds himself reluctantly babysitting a group of orphaned schoolboys in the mountains and falling for their nurse. As danger closes in, Hogg realises he must lead the children 700 miles to safety.

3.0

Bored me

One of those films that aims to be really inspirational, but is far too earnest and wooden. Plus, the fact that the NZer was cut out of it makes the 'true story' aspect hard to swallow. Dreary, is how I would desribe it. Unadventurous filmmaking. 3 stars only because of wide shots of Chinese landscape.

3.0
Variety

Variety

press

Giving Jonathan Rhys Meyers the kind of manly yet paternal role Spencer Tracy once mastered, this carefully wrought international production relates the basic story of reporter George Hogg without any vibrancy, emotion or style.

The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Roger Spottiswoode directs with old-fashioned style, avoiding the saccharine with realistic depictions of a war-ravaged China (where he filmed) and a cast well versed in stiff-upper-lip.

Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

The Kiwi commie has been given the kybosh. It's a pity because the true story is even better than the movie one, and there's no good structural reason why a movie with two male heroes can't work. It's not that uncommon: John Huston made a memorable adventure in 1975 out of Kipling's The Man Who Would Be King, for example. The Killing Fields is another.

2.0
San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle

press

You can be 100 percent in favor of rescuing adorable orphans from war-torn zones and still find The Children of Huang Shi a tough haul.

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

If you can get past the Eurocentric focus, there are worse ways to pass the time than to see The Children of Huang Shi, if only because the glimpse into the time and place are captivating and the images are gorgeous.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Full of incident but nearly devoid of dramatic tension, The Children of Huang Shi is a based-on-fact saga that has lost much of its power on the long road to the screen.

Flicks, Team

Flicks, Team

flicks

In 1930s China, Brit journo George Hogg (Jonathan Rhys Meyers) heads into the heart of the war with Japan. After almost being beheaded in Nanjing, he finds himself reluctantly babysitting a group of orphaned schoolboys in the mountains and falling for their nurse. As danger closes in, Hogg realises he must lead the children 700 miles to safety.

3.0
Variety

Variety

press

Giving Jonathan Rhys Meyers the kind of manly yet paternal role Spencer Tracy once mastered, this carefully wrought international production relates the basic story of reporter George Hogg without any vibrancy, emotion or style.

The New York Times

The New York Times

press

Roger Spottiswoode directs with old-fashioned style, avoiding the saccharine with realistic depictions of a war-ravaged China (where he filmed) and a cast well versed in stiff-upper-lip.

Sydney Morning Herald

Sydney Morning Herald

press

The Kiwi commie has been given the kybosh. It's a pity because the true story is even better than the movie one, and there's no good structural reason why a movie with two male heroes can't work. It's not that uncommon: John Huston made a memorable adventure in 1975 out of Kipling's The Man Who Would Be King, for example. The Killing Fields is another.

2.0
San Francisco Chronicle

San Francisco Chronicle

press

You can be 100 percent in favor of rescuing adorable orphans from war-torn zones and still find The Children of Huang Shi a tough haul.

Los Angeles Times

Los Angeles Times

press

If you can get past the Eurocentric focus, there are worse ways to pass the time than to see The Children of Huang Shi, if only because the glimpse into the time and place are captivating and the images are gorgeous.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

Full of incident but nearly devoid of dramatic tension, The Children of Huang Shi is a based-on-fact saga that has lost much of its power on the long road to the screen.

Bored me

One of those films that aims to be really inspirational, but is far too earnest and wooden. Plus, the fact that the NZer was cut out of it makes the 'true story' aspect hard to swallow. Dreary, is how I would desribe it. Unadventurous filmmaking. 3 stars only because of wide shots of Chinese landscape.

3.0