Capone

Capone

Capone

Tom Hardy is Al Capone in this crime biopic exploring the later years of the infamous gangster's life, where those around him are unsure if he has dementia or if it's all just an act.

Once a ruthless businessman and bootlegger who ruled Chicago with an iron fist, Alfonse Capone was the most infamous and feared gangster of American lore. At the age of 47, following nearly a decade of imprisonment, dementia rots Alfonse’s mind and his past becomes present as harrowing memories of his violent and brutal origins melt into his waking life.

Written and directed by Josh Trank, who made his debut with the critically-praised Chronicle before participating in the production disaster that was 2015's Fantastic Four.

2020103 minsUSA, Canada
CrimeDramaTrue Story & Biography
81%
want to see

Streaming (3 Providers)

Reviews & comments

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

press

Maybe what's most frustrating is how much the movie's deeper themes — morality, mortality, the twilight of power — churn intriguingly at the edges of nearly every scene only to turn toward sentiment, or become merely secondary to its relentless focus on his physical decline.

IndieWire

IndieWire

press

This hollow if perversely watchable exercise in self-annihilation builds to a violent finale that finally makes good on the biopic’s sordid potential, as Trank shoots his way out of oblivion with a sequence in which Capone does the same.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

This is primarily a head movie that unfolds in the sepulchral chambers of Capone's addled skull with a heavy load of woozy Lynchian weirdness and a dash of Kubrick's The Shining.

Variety

Variety

press

Hardy’s performance is starkly unsentimental, yet part of its fetishized authenticity is that Capone never has anything too interesting to say.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

Aside from Hardy’s full-on commitment, Capone seems too dramatically dull and laborious to support its ambition as a subversive biopic or a deeply personal take on public vilification.

2.0
A.V. Club

A.V. Club

press

One might naturally think of The Irishman and its own depiction of time catching up to a fixture of organized crime. But Capone almost plays like a rebuttal to those who insisted Scorsese’s film was too damn long: There’s less power to seeing the pathetic final stretch of a life without the context of everything that came before.

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

It’s an interesting film, which Trank tops off with a contrived finale of bizarre, spectacular (and contrived) violence, yet the woozy slipping-into-dementia-fantasy sequences, although striking, mean sometimes that the visual impact of what we are seeing is sometimes lessened, as we wait to see if it is really happening or not.

3.0
RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

press

Sometimes the effect is akin to watching a late-period Brando performance where you’re not sure who he’s talking to even when he’s addressing another character directly.

Entertainment Weekly

Entertainment Weekly

press

Maybe what's most frustrating is how much the movie's deeper themes — morality, mortality, the twilight of power — churn intriguingly at the edges of nearly every scene only to turn toward sentiment, or become merely secondary to its relentless focus on his physical decline.

IndieWire

IndieWire

press

This hollow if perversely watchable exercise in self-annihilation builds to a violent finale that finally makes good on the biopic’s sordid potential, as Trank shoots his way out of oblivion with a sequence in which Capone does the same.

Hollywood Reporter

Hollywood Reporter

press

This is primarily a head movie that unfolds in the sepulchral chambers of Capone's addled skull with a heavy load of woozy Lynchian weirdness and a dash of Kubrick's The Shining.

Variety

Variety

press

Hardy’s performance is starkly unsentimental, yet part of its fetishized authenticity is that Capone never has anything too interesting to say.

Rolling Stone

Rolling Stone

press

Aside from Hardy’s full-on commitment, Capone seems too dramatically dull and laborious to support its ambition as a subversive biopic or a deeply personal take on public vilification.

2.0
A.V. Club

A.V. Club

press

One might naturally think of The Irishman and its own depiction of time catching up to a fixture of organized crime. But Capone almost plays like a rebuttal to those who insisted Scorsese’s film was too damn long: There’s less power to seeing the pathetic final stretch of a life without the context of everything that came before.

The Guardian

The Guardian

press

It’s an interesting film, which Trank tops off with a contrived finale of bizarre, spectacular (and contrived) violence, yet the woozy slipping-into-dementia-fantasy sequences, although striking, mean sometimes that the visual impact of what we are seeing is sometimes lessened, as we wait to see if it is really happening or not.

3.0
RogerEbert.com

RogerEbert.com

press

Sometimes the effect is akin to watching a late-period Brando performance where you’re not sure who he’s talking to even when he’s addressing another character directly.

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